Loving Correction

Loving Correction

At the foundation of our society is the assumption of moral relativism, making tolerance our chief virtue. Each person gets to decide what's right and wrong, good and evil. As long as you're not hurting anyone, live and let live. There's no such thing as categorical sin or evil.

The only sin left is to call something sin. 
The only evil left is to call something evil.

E Pluribus Unum: Out of the Many, One.

E Pluribus Unum: Out of the Many, One.

As we continue our series, "Prodigal Church" through 1st Corinthians, we see that the startup church has become rife with division. The One has turned into the Many, as they begin to lose their trust in God, and start to place it in leaders. Competing cliques are threatening to tear the church apart. How does God help them heal?

New Series: Prodigal Church, a series in 1 Corinthians

New Series: Prodigal Church, a series in 1 Corinthians

This summer we are going through a series in 1 Corinthians called "Prodigal Church." Why call it "Prodigal Church"? Because the nascent church in the city of Corinth is going through an identity crisis. Corinth, like Boston, was a diverse, influential, thriving, world-class city. It was the center of business, education, and technological advancement. People from all over the Roman Empire would flock to Corinth to make a life, and a name for themselves. Like Boston, Corinth was also a godless city. Christians were under immense pressure to capitulate to the culture instead of creating a new one. 

Good Friday: Celebrating Death?

Good Friday: Celebrating Death?

From time immemorial, Christians haven't just commemorated the death of Jesus Christ—they have actually celebrated it. Every time Christians participate in Holy Communion, we celebrate the death of our Lord and Savior. That's strange, no? Why would you celebrate death? We celebrate the births of Abraham Lincoln, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr. We certainly don't celebrate their assassinations. When your beloved leader is martyred, you don't celebrate their death, you mourn it. You grieve. You weep. You remember, yes, but definitely not celebrate.

Sin as Suicide

Sin as Suicide

Why are we so drawn to self-destructive behavior? We know it's bad for us, and we still do it, willingly. "I'm going to regret this in the morning," we say, right before we excitedly do it. Overspending, overeating, overdrinking, overdosing. When a celebrity or politician gets caught doing some explanation-defying self-destructive act, we all wonder, "what were they thinking? Didn't they realize this would lead to their ruin?" 

Sin as Adultery

Sin as Adultery

The Holy Scriptures tell us over and over, God loves you. We have a hard time grasping the depth of God's love for us, because we have a hard time grasping true love. Our use of the word "love" is too broad, and thus too superficial. Think of the many ways we use the word "love." I love my wife and daughters. I also love my 4 shot Americano from Starbucks. I love my parents. I also love ribeye steak. I love people and I also love the New England Patriots. When the Scriptures tell me that God loves me, does He love me like I love steak? Does He love me like a builder loves the house they built? Does God love me like my neighbor loves his dog? 

Sin as Self-Righteousness

Sin as Self-Righteousness

When you hear about the "self-righteous," who are the first people to come to mind? Pharisees? Fundamentalists? Democrats? Republicans? Vegans? Carnivores? No-carb zealots? Whoever it is, I guarantee you, you didn't think of yourself. You are certainly not self-righteous! You're definitely not like those people!! Oops. We all struggle with the sin of self-righteousness. We are all like the Pharisee in Jesus' parable, who prays: "God, I thank you that I am not like other men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give tithes of all that I get." 

New Series: The Anatomy of Sin

New Series: The Anatomy of Sin

During Lent this year, in preparation for Good Friday and Easter, we are devoting four weeks to an in-depth study of sin. Why? Because without a deep understanding of the bleakness of our sin, we cannot understand the profound brilliance of God's grace. We need to study sin as much as we study grace, because you cannot understand either without understanding both. Moreover, without a robust understanding of sin, you cannot understand God, the world, or even yourself.